The Reds, baseball’s attendance problem, and Cincinnati’s status as a “baseball town”

[Cincinnati Magazine]

In the July issue of Cincinnati Magazine, I’ve got a long story on the Reds and their fans. It could have been much, much longer, as my (very gracious) editor can attest. Still, I managed to put a lot of that ancillary stuff on this blog. I’ll link to those posts below — and if any Reds fans want to share their stories or some feedback, feel free to email or leave a comment.

I started with a post outlining my personal history with the team; from there, I wrote an analysis of the Reds’ place in pop culturea description of the Reds’ 1950s business operationa sketch of Cincinnati’s TV scene, circa 1972; and a link to the local sports radio segment I did (and that crops up in my story).

Clearly, this turned out to be a pretty complex and multifaceted story. My main takeaway, though, was that the Reds know they need to attract more fans and are working incredibly hard to do so. And not just working hard, but working in a highly specialized and professionalized manner. In the story, I note how much corporate speak flies around the team’s offices. So let’s give the last word to that tradition — here, the concept of “strategic buckets,” a concept which the Reds’ management is quite fond of, and a concept which I had to look up:

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About Craig Fehrman

Craig Fehrman is a Ph.D. student in Yale’s English department and a freelance writer. He's working on a book about presidents and their books [more] . . .
This entry was posted in Features, Sports, The Cincinnati Kids. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Reds, baseball’s attendance problem, and Cincinnati’s status as a “baseball town”

  1. Baseball says:

    In those pre-Camelot days baseball was number one on all scorecards.

  2. Pingback: The Bengals, Hamilton County, and the world’s worst stadium lease | Craig Fehrman

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